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Lighthouses 2
More lighthouses from both coasts of the U.S, plus Canada. With each image, you'll find a very brief history. Back to the first page of lightouse images.
For detailed information on these and other lighthouses, visit LighthouseFriends.com.

Juniper Inlet
Jupiter Inlet
Cape Blanco
Cape Blanco
Point Atkinson
Point Atkinson
Middle Sister
Middle Sister
Admiralty Head
Admiralty Head
Cape Canaveral
Cape Canaveral
Mukilteo
Mukilteo
St. Johns River
St. Johns River
Westport
Westport
Point Loma
Point Loma
Amelia Island
Amelia Island
Gig harbor
Gig Harbor
Alcatraz Lighthouse
Alcatraz
Yaquina head Sunset 2
Yaquina Head Sunset 2
East Chop 1
East Chop Lighthouse
Cape Perpetua
Cape Perpetua
e-mail: pat@patschilling.com

Unless otherwise noted, Pat Schilling owns exclusive copyright to all photographic images on patschilling.com. ANY use is prohibited, unless explicitly granted by Pat Schilling. 








































































Juniper Inlet
Jupiter Inlet
The Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse was built on a small hill, located near the junction of the Loxahatchee and Indian Rivers. It commenced operation on July 10, 1860, and stands 108 feet tall. Today, the lighthouse is owned by the Coast Guard and managed by the Loxahatchee River Historical Society. Grounds/tower open during tours.



































Cape Blanco
Cape Blanco
Cape Blanco juts out one and a half miles into the Pacific Ocean from Oregon's southern coast. At the end of the cape is a large headland with 200-foot cliffs along most of its perimeter. This light tower sits atop those cliffs, and is Oregon's southernmost lighthouse.  The light station commenced operation, December 20th, 1870. Today, Friends of Cape Blanco open the lighthouse for tours from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday starting on April 1st and running through October. The grounds near the lighthouse are only open during tour hours. Visitors are allowed to ascend the spiral staircase to the lantern room.





































Point Atkinson
Point Atkinson
Located in Lighthouse Park in West Vancouver, Point Atkinson marks the north side of the entrance to Vancouver Harbour. The original lighthouse, built in 1874, and Vancouver's first, was a wooden tower with attached keeper’s dwelling, and its beacon, shone from a height of ninety-five feet above sea, was visible for fourteen miles.  The present day structure, a 60 feet hexagonal tower, ringed with six rib-like buttresses, was erected in 1912, and is still operational today.






































Middle Sister
Middle Sister
Set 150 feet apart in a straight line, the three fifteen-foot-tall stone towers at Nauset Beach became known as “The Three Sisters of Nauset.” Originally built in 1839, of brick and mortar, they were quickly attacked for their shoddy construction.  Eventually, three new twenty-two-foot-tall wooden towers were constructed thirty feet west of the originals, and activated in April, 1892. Over the years, the Three Sisters have been torn down, rebuilt, and sold off, but in 1983, the National Park Service placed the Three Sisters in a park setting, 1,800 feet east of Nauset Light, where visitors will find them lined up in their original configuration, a straight line with 150 feet between towers. The Middle Sister is in the best condition, and was the last to be used as a navigation aid.




































Admiralty Head
Admiralty Head
Admiralty Head is located on the western edge of Whidbey Island,  overlooking  the Strait of San Juan de Fuca.  This, the second lighthouse at Admiralty Head, was built in a Spanish style and included a two-story dwelling that was linked to the base of a circular tower of roughly the same height, by a one-story foyer. Three bedrooms were located upstairs in the dwelling, while the kitchen, dining room, and a living room were downstairs. The lighthouse was activated on June 25, 1903. By the early 1920s, the bulk of marine traffic was powered by steam rather than wind, permitting the modern vessels to hug the western side of the inlet. The Admiralty Head Lighthouse was thus no longer of consequence, and the light was extinguished in 1922 after just nineteen years of service. Today the lighthouse is home to a gift shop and a museum







































Cape Canaveral
Cape Canaveral
The Cape Canaveral Lighthouse has stood on the cape for over 150 years. The structure has iron plating bolted together and the whole tower is lined with two layers of brick with spacing between the actual brick wall and the iron plating. The lighthouse was designed to be 151 feet tall. Its beam shines approximately 22 nautical miles and continues to be a working lighthouse today.




































Mukilteo
Mukilteo
This 38 foot wooden tower was constructed in 1906. Ownership of the tower, dwellings and grounds was turned over to the city of Mukilteo by the Coast Guard in 2001. Navigational equipment is still maintained by the Coast Guard.







































St. Johns River
St. Johns River
This St. Johns River Lighthouse was actually the third lighthouse built along the River. The first two, built in 1830 and 1835, were poorly located, and both threatened by erosion. The third tower was lit for the first time on January 1, 1859, stood 63 feet tall.. However, even with an additional 15 feet added in 1887, it was still deemed insufficient to be seen, and plans were made for a fourth lighthouse, some 150 feet tall. Instead, in 1929, the lightship Brunswick, stationed off Brunswick, Georgia, was renamed St. Johns and reassigned to a position roughly seven miles offshore from the St. Johns River. In 1930, the tower's light was extinguished. This third St. John's River Lighthouse is located on the grounds of the Mayport Naval Station, and access is limited. It's future remains uncertain.






































Westport
Westport
The Grays Harbor Lighthouse was dedicated on June 30, 1898, in the community of Westport. Standing 107 feet tall, it is the tallest lighthouse in Washington, and the third tallest on the West Coast.






































Point Loma
Point Loma
The Old Point Loma Lighthouse stood watch over the entrance to San Diego Bay for 36 years. At dusk on November 15, 1855, the light keeper climbed the winding stairs and lit the light for the first time. What seemed to be a good location 422 feet above sea level, however, had a serious flaw. Fog and low clouds often obscured the light. On March 23, 1891, the light was extinguished and the keeper moved to a new lighthouse location closer to the water at the tip of the Point. The National Park Service has refurbished the interior to its historic 1880s appearance.






































Amelia Island
Amelia Island
Originally called Cumberland Lighthouse, and built across the St.Mary's River, on Georgia's Cumberland Island, in 1820, the structure was dismantled brick by brick, in 1838, shipped across the river, and reconstructed atop the highest spot on Amelia Island, Florida, where the beacon was more visible.
The above picture was taken in April, 2004, in the midst of a renovation project, completed later that year.





































Gig Harbor
Gig Harbor
The lighthouse was built in 1988 at the entrance to Gig Harbor. The tower stands fifteen feet tall and has an open lantern room.  To finance the structure, community members raised local funds and donated materials and labor for its construction.






































Alcatraz
Alcatraz
This 84-foot, concrete tower was the 2nd lighthouse on Alcatraz island, built, in 1909, just south of the original lighthouse, which had stood since 1853. Attached to the base of the tower was a commodious dwelling designed for three keepers and their families. The original lighthouse, which had been damaged during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, was eventually torn down.






































Yaquina Head Sunset 2
Yaquina Head Sunset 2
After almost two years of toil, Yaquina Head Light, shone for the first time on August 20, 1873. At ninety-three feet, Yaquina Head is the tallest tower on the Oregon coast and is also a sibling to Pigeon Point Lighthouse, California and Bodie Island Lighthouse, North Carolina. The light shines 162 feet above the ocean and can be seen nineteen miles out to sea. The lighthouse is owned by the Bureau of Land Management and is part of the Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area. The Park Gate is open from Sunrise or 7 am, whichever is later, to Sunset every day. The tower is open during posted hours. Yaquina Head is located just north of Newport.






































East Chop 1
East Chop Lighthouse
The conical cast-iron tower of East Chop Lighthouse, stands 40 feet tall, and was erected in 1878, along with a one-and-a-half-story keeper's house. The lighthouse was painted white at first, but in the 1880s it received a coat of reddish-brown paint and became popularly known as the “Chocolate Lighthouse.” In 1934, when the light was being automated, the keeper's house and oil house were removed. In 1988, its daymark was returned back to white, as the dark color was causing excessive heat and condensation in the tower.  East Chop Lighthouse remains an active aid to navigation. It is owned by the Coast Guard and managed by the Martha's Vineyard Historical Society. Grounds are open to the public, and the tower is open during scheduled tours.





































Cape Perpetua
Cape Perpetua
Also know as Cleft of the Rock, it's a privately owned lighthouse, built in 1976 by former lighthouse keeper and noted maritime historian James Gibbs. Cleft of the Rock Lighthouse takes its name from the hymn by Fanny J. Crosby, “He Hideth My Soul in the Cleft of the Rock,”. The light at Cape Perpetua was not originally considered for a lighthouse designation because ocean traffic at this point travels well offshore, but in 1979, the light was made an official navigational aid.  James Gibbs remained actively involved in the Oregon Lighthouse community until passing away at his beloved lighthouse in May 2010. The lighthouse is located on the Oregon Coast, along Hwy 101. The only view is at a highway pullout along a curce just past mile marker 166.